Peru climate talks

Indi Mclymont Lafayette (right), regional coordinator for Panos Caribbean, in discussion with Clifford Mahlung, coordinator for capacity building with the Alliance of Small Island States, at the Peru climate talks on Wednesday. (Photo: Petre Williams-Raynor)

Panos Caribbean\'s Regional Director shares lens time with Amerindians from Lima,Peru

Panos Caribbean\'s Regional Director shares lens time with Amerindians from Lima,Peru. Panos is one of the civil society organisations attending the United Nations Climate talks in Peru. The talks end on December 12.

Lancement:Identification et Enregistrement des électeurs en Haïti : entre attentes, défis et perspectives

 

PANOS CARIBBEAN GOALS:

1. Strengthen the voices of the vulnerable, marginalized and excluded people: Enable Caribbean People to conceive drive and communicate their development agenda.
2. Develop media, information and communication partnerships: Communicating towards development.
3. Policy reform.
4. Become an innovative and effective regional institution making the most of its strengths and resources.

Jamaican NGO moves to boost management of Negril Marine Park

Fishing is one of Negril's more important economic activities.

Fishing is one of Negril’s more important economic activities.

NEGRIL, Westmoreland. 23 June 2015 — The Negril Area Environmental Protection Trust (NEPT), as part of its mandate to manage the Negril Marine Park, recently hosted an awareness-raising workshop to benefit local community stakeholders.

Held on June 10, the workshop attracted the participation of more than 75 participants, among them water sports operators and fisher folk from the five main fishing beaches in the park — Green Island, Orange Bay, Negril, Little Bay, and Broughton.

“The objective of the workshop was to highlight the breaches in the Negril Marine Park as well as to improve the stakeholders understanding of the importance of Special Fishery Conservation Areas, the Marine Park Regulations and the Negril Marine Park Zoning Plan,” said a release from NEPT.

“The overarching goal is to stimulate self-governance or regulation amongst the stakeholders. This will ensure that proper practices are carried out in the Negril Marine Park, thus reducing the expenses incurred in boat patrols and other costly enforcement activities,” the release added.

The day’s event was chaired by NEPT Executive Director Keisha Spencer. who, together with Antoneisha Dunn, a Marine Park Ranger/Fisheries Warden, engaged participants in a pre-test to gauge their understanding of the importance of a marine park, user zones within marine parks and the rules that should govern marine parks.

With that foundation laid, a series of presentations were done, including one from Jean Brown, president of the Negril Coral Reef Preservation Society, on the history of the Negril Marine Park and the Negril Environmental Protection Area (EPA); and another from Ranya Reid-Edwards, an environmental officer from the National Environment and Planning Agency, on the Negril Marine Park Zoning Plan.

“This presentation [by Reid-Edwards] was key as user conflicts often arise in particular no-fishing zones and motorized craft activities in non-motorized zones. The plan is a five-year one and when gazetted will make the Negril Marine Park the first to have a zoning plan,” the release said.

Other presentations included Dr. Karl Aiken’s ‘Fish Sanctuaries In Jamaica: Success Through Enforcement’.

Aiken — a senior lecturer in marine zoology at the Department of Life Sciences, University of the West Indies, Mona — highlighted the need for mechanisms to address the decline in fish stocks in Jamaica, the establishment of sanctuaries as an important mechanism, the success stories in Jamaica, and the benefits to fisher folks when they obey the laws governing special fishery conservation areas.

The workshop concluded with presentation of prizes and a documentation of next steps.

Participants received a variety of prizes, which were awarded for categories such as The Most Indigent Fisherman, The Longest Fishing Fisherman, The Most Knowledgeable Fisherman, The Most Principled Fisherman, The Model Fisherman, and The Best Attendant.

“Next steps from the workshop will include NEPT continuing its monthly outreach meetings with the fishing groups and more so to develop alternative livelihood projects that will support fisher folks [who] are currently engaged in spear fishing. Spear fishing is illegal in a marine park,” the release noted.

“NEPT will also work with the groups to build their capacity and to implement projects that will provide sustainable funding to improve the natural resources in the area and demarcation of the zones in the park to ensure compliance,” it added.

As a part of the next steps, the NEPT team engaged marine police officers in a familiarisation tour of the Negril Marine Park.

“The officers were taken to the northern end of the Negril Marine Park and key areas where breaches were highlighted such as the dive and snorkel sites, swimmers lane and non-motorised zone and conservation zones,” the release revealed.

“The boundaries of the Orange Bay Special Fishery Conservation Area were also shown to the Officers. The familiarisation tour was done as one means of strengthening the collaboration with the Negril Marine Police officers and also to aid in bridging current enforcement gaps,” it said further.

The Negril Marine Park was officially declared on March 4, 1998 and covers a total area of approximately 160 km2, extending from Davis Cove River in Hanover to St. John’s Point in Westmoreland. The boundaries of the park begin at the high water mark on shore to approximately two miles (3.2 km) out to sea.

###

 For more information, contact:

Ms. Keisha Spencer

Tele: 957-3736

Email: negrilepa@gmail.com

Website: www.negrilepa.org

Panos, FES make history: NGOs publish climate change book that caters to the blind

A pleased Valerie Francis (centre), acquisitions librarian at the national library, joins authors Judith Wedderburn (left), of FES and Petre Williams-Raynor, of Panos, in showing off their new book “Climate Change, Gender and Persons with Disabilities in Small Island Developing States” — a legal deposit of which was made to the library earlier this year. (Photo: Radcliffe Morgan)

A pleased Valerie Francis (centre), acquisitions librarian at the national library, joins authors Judith Wedderburn (left), of FES and Petre Williams-Raynor, of Panos, in showing off their new book “Climate Change, Gender and Persons with Disabilities in Small Island Developing States” — a legal deposit of which was made to the library earlier this year. (Photo: Radcliffe Morgan)

PANOS Caribbean and Friedrich Ebert Stiftung (FES) have made history, collaborating to produce a braille publication on climate change that is the first legal deposit of its kind to be made with the National Library of Jamaica.

The publication — titled “Climate Change, Gender and Persons with Disabilities in Small Island Developing States” — documents the vulnerabilities of persons with disabilities to natural disasters, while exploring how men and women are differentially affected.

Authored by multi-award winning journalists and communication professionals Indi Mclymont Lafayette and Petre Williams-Raynor, both of Panos, together with development professional Judith Wedderburn of the FES, it also provides insight into existing legislative and policy frameworks that address issues of climate change, gender and persons with disabilities.

The 44-page book shares, too, lessons learnt from the Panos project titled “Increasing the disaster response mechanism for persons with disabilities in Portmore, St. Catherine, Jamaica via a pilot early warning system”, which was completed this year.

Staff members at the National Library of Jamaica get firsthand knowledge of the braille copy of the new book titled “Climate Change, Gender and Persons with Disabilities in Small Island Developing States”. (Photo: Radcliffe Morgan)

Staff members at the National Library of Jamaica get firsthand knowledge of the braille copy of the new book titled “Climate Change, Gender and Persons with Disabilities in Small Island Developing States”. (Photo: Radcliffe Morgan)

“We are particularly pleased and excited about this legal deposit of a publication; it is not just a publication to put in the library but is contributing to another set of persons we can serve — persons with disabilities,” said a beaming Valerie Francis, acquisitions librarian at the national library.

Importantly, she noted, it is also a historic move and one that other creators should mimic.

“As far as I know, it is the first braille publication that I have got at the national library. But I know there is no fear of contradiction that since the Legal Deposit Act came into being in 2004, this is the first publication in braille,” Francis said.

Authors of the new book “Climate Change, Gender and Persons with Disabilities in Small Island Developing States” Judith Wedderburn (left), of FES, and Petre Williams-Raynor (right), of Panos Caribbean, along with Kevin Bushay, systems administrator and coordinator of services to the blind at the National Library of Jamaica, are all smiles as they show off the print and braille copies of the new book. (Photo: Radcliffe Morgan)

Authors of the new book “Climate Change, Gender and Persons with Disabilities in Small Island Developing States” Judith Wedderburn (left), of FES, and Petre Williams-Raynor (right), of Panos Caribbean, along with Kevin Bushay, systems administrator and coordinator of services to the blind at the National Library of Jamaica, are all smiles as they show off the print and braille copies of the new book. (Photo: Radcliffe Morgan)

Members of the blind community have given their stamp of approval to the new publication.
“The fact that the library is excited about having it there means that it is not just tokenism… It means that people are buying into the fact that persons with disabilities have rights, including the right to information,” noted Executive Director of the Combined Disabilities Association Gloria Goffe.

LIMA CLIMATE TALKS: FAILURE OR GAME CHANGER?

THE last two weeks of negotiations in Lima have not been dubbed a failure. However, it is widely regarded as not having gone as far as it should have, if a new and substantive international climate change deal is to be successfully brokered in Paris next year.

What has emerged from the talks is a draft decision document characterised by weak language — the adoption process for which has been deemed questionable, given reports there was little or no time given for any objections.

Among other things, the five-page document states that the Conference of the Parties (COP) to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change “Decides that the protocol, another legal instrument or agree outcome with legal force under the Convention applicable to all Parties shall address in a balanced manner, inter alia, mitigation adaptation, finance, technology development and transfer, and [sic] capacity building, and transparency of action and support”.

READ MORE AT: https://willieraynor.wordpress.com/2014/12/16/lima-climate-talks-failure-or-game-changer/

ADAPTATION FUND GETS NEW LEASE ON LIFE

New life has been breathed into the Adaptation Fund, currently the most significant, albeit not the singular, source of capital for climate change adaptation financing in the developing world.
 

This is thanks to a donation of Euro 50 million from Germany, made during the recent international climate talks, held over the last two weeks in Lima, Peru.

The donation puts the AF within US$19 million of its US$80-million fundraising target for this year.

 

12 DAYS OF LIMA TALKS BUT STILL NO SIGNIFICANT DECISIONS

We are now 12 days into the Lima Climate Talks and yet there is no clear sign of any significant progress toward a new international agreement on climate change.

This is despite valiant efforts to the contrary, including an impassioned speech from United States Secretary of State John Kerry, which made it clear Thursday that the issue of climate change “should be personal to everyone” and that “the science of climate change is science and it is screaming at us to act”.

READ MORE AT: https://willieraynor.wordpress.com/2014/12/12/12-days-of-lima-talks-but-still-no-significant-decisions/

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